Saturday, July 22, 2006

100 Degrees In The Shade

It’s been so hot, brain denaturing hot, and I don’t have A/C, so all I can do is lie here on my futon and let my hurricane fan blow down on me. It’s too hot to read anything that invokes heat, which means no romances for me for awhile (I’m finishing up The Long Tail instead). Maybe I’ll pick up Annie Proulx’s The Shipping News, which a friend once told me “just makes you feel cold” as you read about Quoyle’s life in Killick-Claw.

What books affect your temperature—whether invoking the heat or a chill—when you read them? Does this affect when you read them?

16 comments:

Robin Brande said...

Swimming to Antarctica, by Lynne Cox. Read about all her open-water, cold (read ice) water swims. Perfect summer book.

Eileen said...

Into Thin Air. Reading about all that nice frozen Everest...mmmmmmm

No AC here either. bleah

kevin said...

I was reading The Weather Makers until the temps hit 100 this week. After that, it seemed a bit too real ...

Milady Insanity said...

No, with the understanding that it's 100 degrees here all year round.

I do give up my habit of eating and reading at the same time when it's really really hot though.

Marta said...

To Kill a Mockingbird. Harper Lee's images of a hot and humid Southern summer have always stayed with me.

"Ladies bathed before noon, after their three-o'clock naps, and by nightfall were like soft teacakes with frostings of sweat and sweet talcum powder."

Kate R said...

It's not a book but the British kids' short movie "the snowman" will cool you down. I love that thing.

Of course chances are good you don't have it on tape like we do.

Monica Burns said...

The only books that have ever chilled me are books by Stephen King. I'll never forget reading Salem's Lot with a butcher knife beside my bed. As if THAT would stop a vampire. LOL

Bernita said...

I hate cold.
Tend to avoid blizzard books at all times, except for Alastair MacLean's Ice Station Zebra.

Lisa Hunter said...

Moby Dick. Melville wrote about weather in a visceral way -- whether describing chilly New England, where a bowl of chowder seems like heaven, or the balmy tropics.

lady t said...

Some books just don't feel right to read during certain seasons-Persuasion and Sense & Sensibility are very autumn to me.

I hate the heat(fortunately have some good A/C) but one of the books I'm reading now,The Burning by Thomas Legendre,takes place in Las Vegas and Arizona which are way more hotter than NY so I feel cooled off in comparison:)

Nell said...

Greg Keye's newest book THE BLOOD KNIGHT. But it wasn't so much that the book made me feel cold, but it did transport me so thoroughly that I forgot I was sitting in sweltering 100 degree heat, which was a terrific thing indeed. Great book.

Penny L. Richards said...

A constant sense of tropical heat and humidity makes Jean Rhys's "Wide Sargasso Sea" a perfect winter book--I wouldn't touch it in July. Well, unless somebody's gonna serve me a BIG icy rum drink....

Keetha said...

Light on Snow by Anita Shreve. I live in the Mississippi Delta; any suggestion of snow and ice is welcome.

Andrea said...

Ramsey Campbell's "Nazereth Hill" chills me to the bone. It's basically about an apartment building that used to be a mental hospital and it's one of the scariest books I've ever read. Set in England, it evokes a damp chill for me.

Anonymous said...

Smilla's Sense of Snow

martha said...

A Brief History of the Dead by Kevin Brockmeier. Brrrr.